Category Archives: Learning

See also: eLearning

Dependence

Stephen Downes’s talk “about a way to redefine ethics” contains a lot that sounds plausible to me. In particular, I liked this: “we learn ethics, but we learn them in such a way that we feel or experience a moral sense, rather than fully formed general principles” (slide 70)
Continue reading

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment

April 7, 1959

Sixty years ago today, I started school. We got a big School Cone and were very excited.

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment

Myths, semi-myths etc.

I bought Clark Quinn’s new book about training myths, semi-myths and misconceptions, and I can whole-heartedly recommend this exciting, in-depth, clinical and precise work. Continue reading

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment

Expectations make the difference

When a chord with a ‘nonharmonic tone’ is played out of context, it sounds awful, but when we hear it as a ‘passing tone’ or as a ‘neighbor tone’, we don’t notice the dissonance — because we expect that it will immediately be resolved. Continue reading

Posted in Learning | 1 Comment

Working memory

The spatial and temporal functions of the working memory may be not only be interrelated. Stephen Downes now expressed the idea that they are indeed similar.
Continue reading

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment

Week 1 of new cMOOC

Why do learners need interactivity? Because watching their peers recognizing helps their own recognizing more than consuming canned resources.
Continue reading

Posted in Learning | 3 Comments

Wish list

There was the question of what @downes and @gsiemens can do working together, and I don’t want to miss this opportunity for an early Christmas wish list 🙂 I there is much to be done in the field of machine-supported human recognition.
Continue reading

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment

Atomic concepts?

“Measure learning outcomes at the atomic concept level” sounds strange.

Continue reading

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment

Shishi Odoshi, or Emergence vs. Threshold

Compare learning with a Shishi Odoshi. The emergent learning is like the ongoing flow which is typical for the largest part of time, before the tipping point of the seesaw is reached. By contrast, the threshold, or “Ah-ha” moment, is only the short point in time where the spectacular, loud, recognizeable event happens.
Continue reading

Posted in Learning | 2 Comments

Learning as By-Product

Remix of links and quotations about happiness and learning as by-products, and induction vs. transmission.
Continue reading

Posted in Learning | Leave a comment